Social class and dating

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In her 2015 book , the sociologist Jessi Streib shows that marriages between someone with a middle-class background and someone with a working-class background can involve differing views on all sorts of important things—child-rearing, money management, career advancement, how to spend leisure time.

In fact, couples often overlook class-based differences in beliefs, attitudes, and practices until they begin to cause conflict and tension.

He said "All the stuff you guys talk about sounds neat, but I have no clue what it means, I'm just lost." (This made me sad because I have spent a lot of time talking to him about all kinds of stuff, not just my work.) And so, I suppose I see their point. What say the dopers: Good advice or just plain elitism? But aside from different experiences, we seem to approach the world in the same ways and have so much in common personality-wise that it hasn't mattered.

But if someone were a champagne drinking museum goer, it might be hard to find something in common with a beer-swigging NASCAR fan.

He (actually the book alternates he and she throughout the book, but I find it annoying and will spare you) will start to resent your friends and then start to resent you. He has privately told me that he feels left out in our groups. My husband and I are from different social classes, mine wealthy, his pretty much white trash (his words).

The whirlwind romance has been fun, but it hasn't been without roadblocks.

Dating outside your social class can be fraught with complications.

People from different social classes have different ways of acting -- similar to a culture -- that can take time to understand.

If your boyfriend has enough family money to buy designer clothing, drive his own sports car and apply to dozens of colleges, while you are flipping burgers at the local hamburger joint to scrape together enough money to attend the local community college, you may have trouble seeing eye to eye.

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